"John Oliphant, printers in Oswego"

from Bob Oliphant
I saw the "Snippets" item about "John Oliphant, printers in Oswego" in the latest Oliphant Clan newsletter. Below is a file that provides a good deal of information about this family. There are some published family trees at Ancestry.com that seem to show Richard Oliphant married to Susanna Young, a sister of the Mormon leader Brigham Young, and Richard being the son of Thomas Oliphant. However, I think people are confusing the Richard Oliphant of the Oswego printing & publishing family with someone else so more work certainly needs to be done to identify his parents. Hope this helps.
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Oliphant Printers, Oswego, N.Y.

1830 Federal Census, Roll 115, p. 134, Oswego, Oswego Co., NY
Richard Oliphant, 1m15-20, 3m20-30, 1f<5, 1f5-10, 1f15-20, 3f20-30, 1f60-70
No Mead on this p.

1840 Federal Census, Roll 325, p. 128, West Oswego, Oswego Co., NY
Enos Mead, 1m40-50, 2f<5, 1f5-10, 1f15-20, 1f30-40
Andrew Oliphant, 1m<5, 1m5-10, 1m10-15, 2m15-20, 1m20-30, 1m30-40, 2f<5, 1f5-10, 2f10-15, 1f15-20, 1f20-30, 1f30-40
Mead & Oliphant are adjacent

1850 Federal Census, Roll M432-576, p. 254/127, Ward 1, Oswego City, Oswego Co., NY
Dwelling 242, Family 320
Richard Oliphant, 48, printer, $1000 RE, b. England
Jno., 18, printer, b. NY
Rich’d, 12, b. NY
Dwelling 242, Family 321
Calvert Mead, 32, merchant, $300 RE, b. CT
Darwin, 21, merchant, b. CT
Daniel Kies, 20, printer, b. NY
Wm. Gale, 18, printer, b. England
Ann Oliphant 46, b. NY
Martha, 19, b. NY
Mary, 17, b. NY
Ruth, 14, b. NY, attends school
Sarah Mead, 22, b. NY
Calvert, 1, b. NY
Mary Riley, 25, b. Ireland

1860 Federal Census, Roll M653-839, p. 66, Oswego PO, Ward 1, Oswego City, Oswego Co., NY
Dwelling 504, Family 515
Richard Oliphant, 59, printer, $1500 RE, $1500 PE, b. England
Anna, 56, b. NY
Ratina, 23, b. NY
Richard, 22, printer, b. NY
Margaret Mills, 20, servant, b. NY
1860 Federal Census, Roll M653-839, p. 68, Oswego PO, Ward 1, Oswego City, Oswego Co., NY
Dwelling 527, Family 537
William Baldwin, 49, contractor, $15,000 RE, $5000 PE, b. NY
Charles P., 22, b. NY
Harris, 19, b. NY
William S., 17, b. NY, attends school
Catharine, 14, b. NY, attends school
Frank T., 10, b. NY, attends school
John Oliphant, 27, printer, $1500 RE, $1000 PE, b. NY
Martha, 21, b. NY
Margaret Fanning, 22, b. Ireland
Maria Finn, 21, b. Canada E.

1870 Federal Census, Roll M593-1073, p. 88/66, Oswego City PO, Ward 1, Oswego City, Oswego Co., NY
Family No. 489, Family No. 526
Oliphant, Ann H., 66, keeping house, $3000 RE, $1500 PE, b. NY
John 37, printer, b. NY, father of foreign birth
Amelia, 32, b. NY, father of foreign birth
Wheler, Mary A., 28, adopt, b. NY, parents of foreign birth
Henisey, Henry, 15, book binder, b. NY, parents of foreign birth
Maloon, Robert, 18, printer, b. NY, parents of foreign birth
1870 Federal Census, Roll M593-1073, p. 137/2, Oswego PO, Ward 3, Oswego, Oswego Co., NY
Family No. 17, Family No. 17
Oliphant, Richard J., 31, printer & book binder, $4000 RE, $15,000 PE, b. NY
Sarah J., 26, keeps house, $3000 RE, b. NY, father of foreign birth

1880 Federal Census, Roll T9-913, ED 246, p. 15/322C, 9 Fourth St., Oswego City, Oswego Co., NY
Dwelling No. 35, Family No. 35
Oliphant, A. H., f., 76, keeping house, b. NY, parents b. CT
Oliphant, J. H., 46, son, printer, b. NY, father b. England, mother b. NY
Adell, 35, boarder, parents b. NY
John 6, grandson, at school, parents b. NY
Amelia R. 41, dau., parents b. NY, father b. England, mother b. NY
Wheeler, Mary, 38, servant, domestic, b. NY, parents b. England
1880 Federal Census, Roll T9-914, ED 250, p. 6/400B, 91 West Third St., Oswego City, Oswego Co., NY
Dwelling No. 35, Family No. 35
Oliphant, Richard J., 42, printer, b. NY, father b. England, mother b. NY
Sarah J., 36, wife, keeps house, b. NY, father b. NY
Richard, 7, son, goes to school, b. NY, parents b. NY
Anna H., 4, dau., b. NY, parents b. NY
Robert, 1, son, b. NY, parents b. NY
Wing, Mary, 23, servant, servant, b. NY, parents b. Ireland
Gallagher, Ella, 20, servant, servant, b. WI, parents b. Ireland

1900 Federal Census, Roll T623-1143, ED 124, p. 2B, Ward 3, City of Oswego, Oswego Town, Oswego Co., NY
156 West Sixth St., Dwelling No. 42, Family No. 44
Tibbets, John H., head, b. Aug 1820, 79, m. 56y, b. NY, father b. unknown, mother b. NY, landlord, owns home free
Mary E., wife, b. Aug 1821, 78, m. 56y, 5 children 5 living, b. NY, father b. unknown, mother b. NY
Calvert H., son, b. Aug 1849, 50, m. 23y, b. NY, parents b. NY, carpenter
Oliphant, Amelia J., lodger, b. July 1836, 63, single, father b. England, mother b. NY
130 West Sixth St., Dwelling No. 43, Family No. 45
Oliphant, Sarah, head, b. May 1844, 56, wd., 3 children 3 living, b. NY, parents b. NY, publisher, owns home free
Richard, son, b. Feb 1874, 26, m. 3y, b. NY, parents b. NY, supt. publishing co.
Robert, son, b. Aug 1878, 21, single, b. NY, parents b. NY, asst. supt. pub. co.
Anna H., dau., b. May 1876, 24, single, b. NY, parents b. NY, school teacher
Grace, dau.-in-law, b. Oct 1874, 25, m. 3y, b. NY, parents b. NY
Mack, Mary, cook, b. Feb. 1873, 27, single, b. NY, father b. NY, mother b. Ireland, cook
Coot, Martha, maid, b. June 1885, 14, single, b. Germany, parents b. Germany, to US 1886, servant
Mead, D. W., nephew, b. Jan 1856, 44, m. 21y, b. NY, father b. CT, mother b. NY, druggist
1900 Federal Census, Roll T623-1143, ED 124, p. 2B, Ward 3, City of Oswego, Oswego Town, Oswego Co., NY
90 West Sixth St., Dwelling No. 48, Family No. 50
Oliphant, Adele B., head, b. Feb 1846, 54, wd., 3 children 1 living, b. NY, parents b. NY, owns home free
Lusey, Bridget, servant, b. Feb. 1854, 46, single, b. Ireland, parents b. Ireland, to US 1855, servant
Oliver, Sarah T., boarder, b. Sept 1852, 47, wd., 0 children, b. NY, father b. NY, mother b. England, teacher at pub. school

Oswego, New York Directories, 1888, 1890-93

Name: Adella Oliphant
Year: 1888
Location 2: 90 W Sixth

Name: Richard J. Oliphant
Location 1: 219 W First
Occupation: publisher; job printer, book binder, book seller and stationer, and prest
Year: 1888
Business Name: Oliphant & Boyd; Oswego City Directory; Oswego Street Railway Co.
Location 2: W Sixth corner Oneida

Name: Amelia R. Oliphant
Year: 1888
Location 2: 161 W Third

Name: R. J. Oliphant; Andrew Boyd
Location 1: 219 W First
Occupation: publishers
Year: 1888
Business Name: Oliphant & Boyd; Oswego City Directory

Name: R. J. Oliphant; H. D. McCaffrey; H. A. Wilcox; J. Dowdle; W. S. Turner
Location 1: W Bridge near Third avenue
Occupation: president; vice-president; sec'y; treasurer; superintendent
Year: 1888
Business Name: Oswego Street Railway Company

Name: Adele Oliphant
Year: 1890, 1891
Location 2: 90 W Sixth

Name: John Oliphant
Occupation: student
Year: 1890, 1891
Location 2: boards 90 W Sixth

Name: Richard Oliphant
Occupation: printer
Year: 1890, 1891
Business Name: R. J. Oliphant
Location 2: boards 130 W Sixth

Name: Richard J. Oliphant
Location 1: 219 W First
Occupation: publisher; job printer, book binder, book seller and stationer
Year: 1890, 1891
Business Name: Oliphant & Boyd; Oswego City Directory
Location 2: W Sixth corner Oneida

Name: R. Amelia Oliphant
Year: 1890, 1891
Location 2: 155 W Third

Name: R. J. Oliphant; Andrew Boyd
Location 1: 219 W First
Occupation: publishers
Year: 1890, 1891
Business Name: Oliphant & Boyd; Oswego City Directory

Name: Adele Oliphant
Year: 1892, 1893
Location 2: 90 W Sixth

Name: John Oliphant
Occupation: student
Year: 1892, 1893
Location 2: boards 90 W Sixth

Name: Richard Oliphant
Occupation: printer
Year: 1892, 1893
Business Name: R J Oliphant
Location 2: boards 130 W Sixth

Name: Richard J Oliphant
Location 1: 219 W First
Occupation: publisher; job printer, bookbinder, bookseller and stationer
Year: 1892, 1893
Business Name: Oswego City Directory
Location 2: 130 W Sixth

Name: Ruth A Oliphant
Year: 1892, 1893
Location 2: 155 W Third

Churchill, John C. Landmarks of Oswego County, New York. Syracuse, N.Y.: D. Mason, 1895, found at Ancestry.com.
p. 408-409: “Meanwhile, in 1830, when Anti-Masonry had reached its height, Richard Oliphant established the Oswego Free Press and published it as an Anti-Masonic organ until April 16, 1834. Anti-Masonry having died out, he sold out to George G. Foster, who changed the name of the paper to The Oswego Democrat. One year of opposition to the firmly-established Palladium was sufficient to close the career of the younger journal.
“On the 1st of January 1843 the Oswego County Whig was started by A. Jones & Co., with Richard Oliphant, editor. On the 9th of May of the same year Mr. Jones withdrew from the firma and Mr. Oliphant joined with Daniel Ayer, and the firm continued the publication until about the close of the year, when Mr. Ayer withdrew and Mr. Oliphant continued alone until September 27, 1844. He then sold out to Daniel Ayer and permanently retired from the editorial chair…”
p. 410: “Besides these living newspapers and those that have been absorbed by them, there have been a few ephemeral journal published here… A paper called Equal Rights was issued in the village a short time in 1837, printed by Richard Oliphant for unknown publishers…”
Family Sketches, p. 307: “Oliphant, Richard J., the well known printer and publisher of Oswego, and son of Richard Oliphant, connected many years with the same business, was born in Oswego on the 16th of August, 1838. His opportunities for obtaining an education were confined to the district schools and the printing office of his father, beginning work in the latter early in life. In 1860 he, in association with his brother, the late John H. Oliphant, purchased the printing and book binding business of their father. Very soon afterward John H. went to Washington in the interst of William Baldwin, contractor, where he remained about a year. Returing to the office, a few moths later, Richard J. purchased his interest and has since carried on the business alone and with marked success. Devoting himself earnestly to his business for which he has special fitness as well as natural taste, Mr. Oliphant has now one of the largest and most expensively equipped printing plants in Central New York. Connected with his printing business Mr. Oliphant conducts the largest book and stationery store in Oswego, and has recently added facilities for lithographing. He is a Republican in politics and has represented the third ward in the Board of Aldermen.”

McMurtrie, Douglas C.. A bibliography of books, pamphlets and broadsides printed at Auburn, N.Y., 1810-1850. Buffalo, N.Y.? at Ancestry.com lists a number of books, etc., printed by Richard Oliphant of Auburn NY.

Records of the village of Oswego. Oswego, N.Y.?: unknown, 1874, at Ancestry.com has a number of references to bills from Richard Oliphant for printing services rendered to the village of Oswego.

Johnson, Crisfield. History of Oswego County, New York : with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts, 1877.
p. f176: “Among the representative journalists of this county and State, none stood higher in the general estimation of the public than did he whose name heads this brief narrative. We have before us numerous sketches of his life and character, from which we glean the following:
“Richard Oliphant was born in the city of London, on the 23d of January, 1801. He came to this country and took up his residence in the then village of Auburn when he was twelve years of age. He early evinced a love for the ‘art preservative of all arts,’ which he regarded, with professional zeal, as the most ennobling occupation, down to the day of his death. The first type he ever set was in 1810, when he commenced, like most boys in a printing-office, by setting up ‘pi,’ in Russell’s court, Drury lane, London. The first regular composition he undertook was at Auburn, in 1814, under the instructions of Thurlow Weed. In 1816 he commenced work for Skinner & Crosley, publishers of the Auburn Gazette. In April, 1823, Mr. Oliphant set the first type that ever filled a ‘stick’ in Syracuse. This was for John Dunford, who started the Onondaga Gazette, as the first paper published in Syracuse, and employed Mr. Oliphant as printer. the latter did not remain long at Syracuse, for during the same year (1823) he started a paper at Auburn, of which he was editor and proprietor, called the Auburn Free Press. This was a good-looking weekly for that day, nearly as large as the Commercial Times, and it was an enthusiastic supporter of John Quincy Adams. In 1829 Mr. Oliphant sold the paper to his brother Henry, and in the month of November of that year came to Oswego, where he continued to reside till his death. In ad address he delivered at a supper given on Franklin’s birthday, in 1860, he told how he came to visit Oswego. He said:
“’As early as 1822, I made a hasty trip to this, then small, village, and at that time had almost as much idea of locating here as of planting a standard in the moon. Though then passionately devoted to my calling, there were other passions and other attractions that drew me hither. A certain young lady, who has since grown rather matronly, had captivated my boyish affections. I was in pursuit of her, and as she resided some few miles east of this, my peregrinations took me through Oswego.’
“These visits continued until 1826, when Mr. Oliphant was married to Miss Anna H. Jones, the lady he refers to in his Franklin supper address. The nuptials were solemnized in a log house in the town of Scriba, and he added to the above that ‘the humble domicile appeared as fine in his eyes as any that now grace the city,’ and that ‘ever since he had cherished a warm regard for log cabins.’
“On the 17th of February, 1830, Mr. Oliphant issued the first number of the Oswego Free Press, which he continued to publish till April 16, 1834. On the 2d day of January, 1837, the Oswego County Whig was started by A. Jones & Co., with Richard Oliphant as editor. On the 9th of May Mr. Jones withdrew, and Oliphant & Ayer, formerly of the Herkimer County Journal, became proprietors. At the close of the year Mr. Ayer withdrew, and Mr. Oliphant continued the paper until September 27, 1844, which was the last of his editorial labor. After this time he devoted himself to the job-printing business, which he continued to within three or four years of his death, when his sons, J. H. and Richard J., relieved him of the cares of the office by becoming proprietors, although, down to the week before his death, he occasionally worked at the case, for which he used to say his ‘fingers had an itching.’ In 1818, Mr. Oliphant published the ‘Western Wanderer,’ a neatly-printed volume; and in 1819, the Phoenix, a monthly paper, to which he was a regular contributor. He also contributed to the ‘Oasis,’ a very handsomely gotten up and finely-printed publication, issued in 1837.
“Besides being a pungent paragraphist and good political writer, Mr. Oliphant possessed a fine poetic strain, and some of his poems, which we have seen and perused with pleasure, denote the innate beauties of his mind, while doing honor to his brilliant intellect and his vivid imagination.
“In a sketch of this kind it is impossible to enter into the various acts of a long and busy life, and we therefore close with the following apt quotation from the corresp9ondence of one who knew Mr. Oliphant well, and appreciated his worth heartily:
“’Among the printers who knew him he will be long remembered as one whose proof-sheet was free from all errors of the heart. Peace, then, to the memory of a brother TYPO, to whom death so suddenly put his final period. The grim tyrant of the tomb seldom, if ever, embraced a husband, father, or friend, with kindlier qualities of our humanity, than he who has suddenly been taken away. The earth-clods of the cold and silent grave never covered a bosom in which beat a nobler, more generous, and truer heart, and he will long be missed with regret in the circles in which he move.’
“Mr. Oliphant took a deep interest in all matters pertaining to the moral and intellectual, as well as in the material, progress and development of Oswego. Especially with regard to educational affairs is this true. HE lived to see the growth of the present excellent system of public instruction, and no one man did more to bring the schools up to their present high standard—which is not surpassed by any in the State—than he did. For many years he was president of the board of education, and filled that office with marked ability and zeal.
“At his death, which occurred March 8, 1862, Mr. Oliphant left a widow and five children, all of whom are living. Of the latter, John H. and Richard J. are printers (the former conducting the business of his father), Sarah E. is the wife of George B. Powell, Martha A. the wife of D. M. Mead,, the druggist, and R. Amelia resides with her mother. These are all residents of Oswego.”
Engraved photograph of R. Oliphant.
p. 435: “Names of citizens who assisted and contributed towards the publication of the history of Oswego County, with personal statistics:…
“Oliphant, R. J., Bookbinder, Printing, and Stationery (established 1828), 176 W. First st., b. Oswego, N.Y., s. 1837.”

Child, Hamilton,. Gazetteer and business directory of Oswego County, N.Y. for 1866-7. Oswego, N.Y.: H. Child, 1966.
p. 165: full-page ad for R. J. Oliphant, Book-Bindery:

p. 203: “R. J. Oliphant, Steam Book and Job Printer, over 110, 112 and 114 West First street, has one of the most extensive offices for doing all kinds of Letter Press Printing, in this part of the country. He has also in connection with his establishment, an extensive Book Bindery, superintended by a binder of long experience. See card, page 165.”

Death of Richard Oliphant, the Oldest Printer in the State.
Oswego, N.Y., Saturday, March 8
Richard Oliphant, the oldest printer in the State and one of our most esteemed citizens, fell dead in the street this afternoon. His death has cast a gloom over the entire city.
The New York Times, New York, N.Y., March 9, 1862.

HYMENEAL
Oliphant—Pritchard
Worcester, Mass., Oct. 15.—The marriage of Miss Grace Pritchard, daughter of Rev. Dr. Archibald McCullagh, pastor of Plymouth church, and Mr. Richard Oliphant of Oswego, N.Y., was solemnized Thursday evening at six o’clock, at the house of Dr. McCullagh, 83 Elm street. Owing to the indisposition of the bride, the ceremony which was to take place at Plymouth church, was made as private as possible and only relatives and a few intimate friends to the number of 50, were invited to the house. Rev. Archibald McCullagh officiated, assisted by Rev. C. H. Jones of Bayonne, N.J.
The bride was given away by her brother, Mr. Charles Pritchard, and her sister, Miss May Pritchard, was the maid of honor. She was attended by six bridesmaids, Miss Dean and Miss James of Brooklyn, N.Y., Miss Dora Pritchard, Miss Anna McCullough, Miss Whitcomb of Worcester street, and Miss Anna Oliphant of Oswego, N.Y. They all wore yellow mousseline de soie over yellow silk and carried bouquets of yellow roses, except the maid of honor, who carried white roses. John Oliphant, cousin of the groom, was best man.
The bride’s gown was of white satin. She wore a veil of tulle and the bouquet was of white roses, lilies of the valley and orchids.
The ushers were Mr. Archibald McCullagh of Brooklyn, Mr. Samuel McCullagh of Philadelphia, Mr. Chas. Pritchard of New York and Mr. Martin McCullagh, all brothers of the bride; Mr. Edward Whitney and Mr. Roy Sumner.
A reception from 7 to 9 o’clock followed the ceremony, when 200 friends of the newly married couple were present in large number to extend their best wishes. Treds’s orchestra played and Habenstein of Hartford catered. Mr. and Mrs. Oliphant will go to their home, 130 West Sixth street, Oswego, N.Y., where they will be at home after Nov. 1.
Among the out of town guests at the reception were: Mr. and Mrs. Will Donald, Brookline; the Misses Nash, Madison, Conn.; Mrs. M. L. Coward, New Haven; Mrs. L. B. Shosnor, Philadelphia; Miss Pauline Deane and Miss Margaret James, Brooklyn; Mrs. Elliott of New York; Mr. and Mrs. McKeon and Miss McKeon, Brooklyn; Rodney Fish, Brooklyn.
Oswego Daily Times, Oswego, N.Y., Monday, October 18, 1897, p. 5.

Mrs. Adele B. Oliphant Stricken
Mrs. Adele B. Oliphant, widow of John H. Oliphant, of 90 West Sixth street, suffered a stroke of paralysis at West Sixth and Bridge streets last night and is in a serious condition. She was taken to the home of Mrs. M. P. Gray, 147 West Fifth street. Her son, the Rev. John Oliphant, has been summoned.
The Oswego Daily Palladium, Oswego, N.Y., Wednesday, December 20, 1916, p. 3.

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